The State Dining Room

This was the formal dining room in the 1860’s.  Historic evidence shows that this room was hung in the late 19th century with a red flock paper when it was a billiard room. The strong blue on the walls echoes the colour in the original 19th century-stained glass windows and provides a backdrop for the Langrishe family portraits, which originated in Knocktopher Abbey, Kilkenny, and are now in the care of the State. Most large estate houses would have had both a formal and informal Dining Room. The collection of silverware contains some pieces from the original 18th century collection, purchased by Walter Butler, the 18th  Earl after his marriage to the wealthy heiress Anna Maria Price Clarke.

Highlights

Surtout de Table

A surtout de table was a large centrepiece with mirrored plateau and numerous candelabras and other possible display pieces on top, all to reflect and give more light and sparkle to an important occasion.

This Regency gilt-bronze Surtout de Table from circa 1805 is attributed to Rundell, Bridge & Rundell, Bronze work possibly supplied by Alexis De Caix.

Epergne

An epergne is a  type of table centrepiece that is usually made of silver.

This epergne is a late 19th century Edwardian style parcel gilt centrepiece with 3 small glass bowls and one large fruit dish for the serving of fruit and sweetmeats.

Compote dish

A compote dish is a serving dish that was made to serve the culinary dish called compote (a type of stewed fruits dish).

This pair of compote dishes made of silver gilt stand with large glass serving dish is from the late 19th century.

Glasses

These Waterford glasses were of a particular cut “Cashel Cut” made for embassies by the OPW during the 1970’s. The set comprises of Liqueur glasses, cocktail glasses, Claret glasses (Glass for red wine. Claret is a generic term for red wines from the Bordeaux region in France.) & Hock glasses (Glass for white wine. Hock is a generic term for white wines from Germany).

 

Sideboard

This Sheraton style mahogany sideboard has a  large centre drawer flanked by two cupboards one of which hold 12 wine bottles. There is a hidden drawer underneath the centre drawer.

Dishes Cover

A pair of Meat Dish Covers, Old Sheffield Plate c. 1840. Shell, leaf and gadroon borders, the covers are engraved to one side with a coat of arms.

A set of three 19th century oval SP dish covers, each with the Ormonde Crest, and surmounted with a rope cast handle.

 

Dinner service

Purchased for display purposes and bearing the makers mark Copeland Spode dating it to the late 19th century when Copland merged with the Spode Pottery Company. Spode was founded in Stoke-on-Trent in 1733 by Josiah Spode and he developed the technique of making “Bone China” from a combination of clay and ground cattle bones. he also developed a technique of Undergalze apinting in 1784. William Copeland formed a partnership with the company in 1805. The makers mark on this service was the one used after 1890.

The Paintings

The paintings on display are part of a generous bequest to Kilkenny Castle from Lady Grania Langrishe in July of 2012.

The Langrishe Baronetcy of Knocktopher Abbey in the County of Kilkenny is a title in the Baronetage of Ireland. It was created on 19 February 1777 for Sir Hercules Langrishe, who represented Knocktopher in the Irish House of Commons. The Langrishe family were part the social world of the Butlers. They were present at many social occasions in Kilkenny Castle including the Royal Visits to the Castle.

The family seat from 1679 to 1981 was Knocktopher Abbey, County Kilkenny.

Right Hon. Sir Hercules Langrishe (1731-1811)

1st Baronet Knocktopher 

Artist: unknown

MP for Knocktopher for 40 years until the Act of union in 1801. It is said he bought up lands in Knocktopher and leased it to Catholic residents. He was created 1st Baronet in 1777. Best remembered for his pro Catholic Relief stance and his exchange of views with his friend Edmund Burke. He introduced the Catholic Relief Bill in 1792 and The Catholic Enfranchisement Act which passed in 1793.

Sir James Langrishe (1832-1905)

4th Baronet Knocktopher

Artist: unknown

Wearing a dark green suit and tie with a white shirt against a dark brown background. Some paint loss. Married twice and was a Lt. Col. In the army and High Sheriff of Kilkenny 1866. Succeeded by his son Herky Langrishe as 5th Baronet.

Kilkenny Hunt

Artist: unknown

Group portrait of four men and a lady on horseback with hounds in the foreground. The central figure is Herky Langrishe KKC.00603 and the lady his wife. Lady Grania Langrishe informed us that when a member of the hunt died new heads were painted over the old.

 

Sir Robert Langrishe (1756–1835)

2nd Baronet Knockopher 

Artist: unknown

He succeeded his father to the title. MP for Knocktopher 1783-1796, he graduated as a barrister from Kings Inn and both father and son sat in Parliament at the same time. He was heavily involved in the theatre and was Revenue Commissioner in 1796.

Rev. Sir Hercules Richard Langrishe (1782-1862)

3rd Baronet Knocktopher 

Artist: unknown

He entered the church and became 3rd Barnonet on the death of his father. He was the maternal grandfather of Charlotte Wheeler Cuffe (nee Williams) the notable botanical artist of the early 20th century who’s collection of paintings are now in the Library of the  National Botanic Gardens.

Hercules Ralph Langrishe (1888-1917)

Artist: unknown

2nd Lieutenant Montgomery shire Yeomanry attached to Royal Flying Corps, eldest son of the 5th Baronet, he was killed while flying on duty in 1917 aged 27 years

 

 

Unknown gentleman

Artist: unknown

Oil portrait of an unknown gentleman possibly Sir Robert Langrishe 2nd Baronet.

Unknown gentleman

Artist: unknown

Portrait of an unknown gentleman  perhaps John Langrishe (1660-1735), the first of the family to arrive in Knocktopher, father of Robert.

Robert Langrishe (1696-1769)

Artist: unknown

Possible later copy of a 17th century portrait of Robert Langrishe. He held the office of High Sheriff in 1740 and completed the outright purchase of the fee simple of the Knocktopher lands of over 800 acres in 1757 according to William Nolan and Kevin Phelan in Kilkenny, History and Society 1990. His son Hercules was to become first Baronet of Knocktopher.

Sir Hercules Langrishe (1859–1943)

5th Baronet Knocktopher 

Artist: unknown

He gained the rank of Captain in the service of the Army Motor Reserve, of Captain and Honorary Major in the service of the 3rd Battalion, Oxfordshire Light Infantry  and of Temporary Commander in the service of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve. He fought in the First World War, in the Mediterranean and Russia. He succeeded to the title of 5th Baronet on 20 August 1910. He held the office of Justice of the Peace for County Kilkenny, of High Sheriff of County Kilkenny and the office of Deputy Lieutenant of County Kilkenny.